Marcel Duchamp, Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2, 1912, oil on canvas, 147 x 89.2 cm, Philadelphia Museum of Art.
According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 reveals the artist’s interest in Cubism, though unlike Braque and Picasso, Duchamp’s figure is dynamic. You can view Nude Descending a Staircase No. 1 by clicking here.

Marcel Duchamp, Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2, 1912, oil on canvas, 147 x 89.2 cm, Philadelphia Museum of Art.

According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 reveals the artist’s interest in Cubism, though unlike Braque and Picasso, Duchamp’s figure is dynamic. You can view Nude Descending a Staircase No. 1 by clicking here.

André Bauchant, The Funeral Procession of Alexander the Great, 1940, oil on canvas, 114 x 194.9 cm, Tate Collection.
André Bauchant was a French artist interested in classical subject matter. Here, he depicts the funeral of the military leader and King of Macedonia, Alexander the Great, who died in Babylon of a fever in 323 BC.

André Bauchant, The Funeral Procession of Alexander the Great, 1940, oil on canvas, 114 x 194.9 cm, Tate Collection.

André Bauchant was a French artist interested in classical subject matter. Here, he depicts the funeral of the military leader and King of Macedonia, Alexander the Great, who died in Babylon of a fever in 323 BC.

I’m officially halfway through my masters dissertation, but all I want to do is bake cakes and watch Sons of Anarchy.

Peter Blake, Portrait of David Hockney in a Hollywood Spanish Interior, 1965, acrylic, graphite and ink on canvas, 182.8 x 152.8 cm, Tate Collection.
I love the clever collaged effect of this composition, especially with the defined balloon outlines contrasted against the washed-out look of the figures. Blake used a photograph of Hockney by Michael Cooper to base his portrait on, though the two British artists were good friends.

Peter Blake, Portrait of David Hockney in a Hollywood Spanish Interior, 1965, acrylic, graphite and ink on canvas, 182.8 x 152.8 cm, Tate Collection.

I love the clever collaged effect of this composition, especially with the defined balloon outlines contrasted against the washed-out look of the figures. Blake used a photograph of Hockney by Michael Cooper to base his portrait on, though the two British artists were good friends.

Sandro Botticelli, The Last Communion of Saint Jerome, early 1490s, tempera and gold on wood, 34.3 x 25.4 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Botticelli painted this small devotional image for Francesco del Pugliese, a wool merchant from Florence. The lunette above the main composition was executed by Bartolomeo di Giovanni, and the added frame was carved in the workshop of Giuliano da Maiano.

Sandro Botticelli, The Last Communion of Saint Jerome, early 1490s, tempera and gold on wood, 34.3 x 25.4 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Botticelli painted this small devotional image for Francesco del Pugliese, a wool merchant from Florence. The lunette above the main composition was executed by Bartolomeo di Giovanni, and the added frame was carved in the workshop of Giuliano da Maiano.

Thomas Ganter, Man with a Plaid Blanket, 2014, oil on canvas, [no dimensions], currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery, London.
Here we have the winning portrait from this year’s BP Portrait Awards. Ganter’s piece is a depiction of a homeless man from Frankfurt named Karel. The sitter’s pose and surroundings - namely the gold background and coffee-cup rose - are crucial to the portrait’s overall effect. Ganter has said of the work: ‘By portraying a homeless man in a manner reserved for nobles or saints, I tried to emphasise that everyone deserves respect and care. Human dignity shouldn’t be relative, or dependent on socioeconomic status.’ [Source]. I adore this concept, but I do think that Karel’s facial expression is really what makes this piece as compelling as it is.

Thomas Ganter, Man with a Plaid Blanket, 2014, oil on canvas, [no dimensions], currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Here we have the winning portrait from this year’s BP Portrait Awards. Ganter’s piece is a depiction of a homeless man from Frankfurt named Karel. The sitter’s pose and surroundings - namely the gold background and coffee-cup rose - are crucial to the portrait’s overall effect. Ganter has said of the work: ‘By portraying a homeless man in a manner reserved for nobles or saints, I tried to emphasise that everyone deserves respect and care. Human dignity shouldn’t be relative, or dependent on socioeconomic status.’ [Source]. I adore this concept, but I do think that Karel’s facial expression is really what makes this piece as compelling as it is.

Isabella Watling, Gina and Cristiano, 2014, oil on canvas, [no dimensions], currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery, London.
This was my personal favourite from this year’s BP Portrait Awards. I love everything about it: the figure’s tall, dark form; his outstretched hand; that gorgeous white dog; the glint from the gentleman’s earring; and his slightly tense, yet accepting, expression. Anything that alludes to the work of the Old Masters is going to be good in my eyes! You can’t look at this painting and not think of Van Dyck or Gainsborough or Reynolds.

Isabella Watling, Gina and Cristiano, 2014, oil on canvas, [no dimensions], currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

This was my personal favourite from this year’s BP Portrait Awards. I love everything about it: the figure’s tall, dark form; his outstretched hand; that gorgeous white dog; the glint from the gentleman’s earring; and his slightly tense, yet accepting, expression. Anything that alludes to the work of the Old Masters is going to be good in my eyes! You can’t look at this painting and not think of Van Dyck or Gainsborough or Reynolds.

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The John Madejski Garden at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London

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The 2014 BP Portrait Awards at the National Portrait Gallery

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Guacamole and mojitos at Wahaca in Covent Garden

I find that when I spend three hours working in a library, no matter how nice that library may be, I need something to look forward to at the end of the day - this usually involves food and/or a really great exhibition. After spending the morning and afternoon researching at the V&A’s National Art Library, I met with my good friend for a late lunch at Wahaca, before heading to this year’s BP Portrait Awards. I’ll try and post some of the works from the show this evening, so keep an eye out!