Writing my masters dissertation: a story in pictures

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"I’m going to work so, so hard on this dissertation, it’s going to be the best thing I’ve ever written, I’m going to read anything and everything that has ever been published, I’m going to WIN. Look how intelligent I look when I put my hand on my chin and pretend I have a clue what this author is talking about."

Federico Zandomeneghi, Reading by a Window, n.d., oil on canvas, 55.5 x 46.1 cm, Private Collection. Source

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"No, I’m not sleeping. I’m thinking with my eyes closed."

Johannes Vermeer, A Maid Asleep, c.1657, oil on canvas, 87.6 x 76.5 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

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"Is my hair falling out? IS MY HAIR FALLING OUT?!"

Gustave Courbet, Jo, La Belle Irlandaise, 1865-66, oil on canvas, 55.9 x 66 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

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"WHAT DO YOU MEAN I’M NOT EVEN HALF WAY THROUGH?!"

Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1893, crayon and tempera on paper, 91 x 73.5 cm, National Gallery, Oslo. Source

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"Goodbye, sweet sanity."

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, The Balloon, 1870, oil on canvas, 136.7 x 86.5 cm, Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Source

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"Alright, alcohol. You win."

Edgar Degas, In a Café (L’Absinthe), 1875-76, oil on canvas, 92 x 68.5 cm, Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Source

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”-“

Henry Fuseli, Silence, 1799-1801, oil on canvas, 63.5 x 51.5 cm, Kunsthaus, Zurich. Source

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"Remember when life was fun?"

Frederic Leighton, Memories, 1883, oil on canvas, 64.5 x 76 cm, Private Collection. Source

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"Just the conclusion to go, just the conclusion to go …"

Roy Lichtenstein, Crying Girl, 1964, porcelain enamel on steel, 116.8 cm × 116.8 cm, Milwaukee Art Museum. Source

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I’VE FINIIIIISHED!!! BOW DOWN, BITCHES.

John Lavery, Anna Pavlova, 1911, oil on canvas, [no dimensions], Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow. Source

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"Yes, that’s right: I have completed my dissertation. I expect there to be a full parade, with flowers, horses and fit blokes, upon my return to society."

John Collier, Queen Guinevere’s Maying, 1900, oil on canvas, [no dimensions], Cartwright Hall Art Gallery, Bradford. Source

Pablo Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905, oil on canvas, 212.8 x 229.6 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D. C. Source
Saltimbanques, or circus performers, became a major theme in Picasso’s art between the years of 1904 and 1906, according to the National Gallery of Art. This particular composition was reworked again and again until the artist was happy with it.

Pablo Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905, oil on canvas, 212.8 x 229.6 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D. C. Source

Saltimbanques, or circus performers, became a major theme in Picasso’s art between the years of 1904 and 1906, according to the National Gallery of Art. This particular composition was reworked again and again until the artist was happy with it.

Ernest Procter, The Zodiac, 1925, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 167.6 cm, Tate Collection. Source
All twelve are here, can you spot yours?

Ernest Procter, The Zodiac, 1925, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 167.6 cm, Tate Collection. Source

All twelve are here, can you spot yours?

František Kupka’s studies for Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colours

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Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colours, 1912, gouache and ink on paper, 41.6 x 47.3 cm, MoMA, New York. Source

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Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colours, 1912, gouache and ink on paper, 29.2 x 29.5 cm, MoMA, New York. Source

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Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colours, 1912, gouache and ink on paper, 21.6 x 22.9 cm, MoMA, New York. Source

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Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colours, 1912, gouache and ink on paper, 21.3 x 22.9 cm, MoMA, New York. Source

These abstract studies by Czech artist František Kupka began as observational drawings of a young girl playing with a ball. The final painting, an oil on canvas, was exhibited at the 1912 Salon d’Automne in Paris.

Hans Baldung Grien, Rest on the Flight Into Egypt, c.1514, oil on wood, 49 x 39 cm, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg. Source
I love the fairytalesque background of Grien’s Rest on the Flight Into Egypt; It looks like something from a Disney animation. I’m not sure why Joseph has been made to look like such a creeper, though!

Hans Baldung Grien, Rest on the Flight Into Egypt, c.1514, oil on wood, 49 x 39 cm, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg. Source

I love the fairytalesque background of Grien’s Rest on the Flight Into Egypt; It looks like something from a Disney animation. I’m not sure why Joseph has been made to look like such a creeper, though!

George Catlin

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The White Cloud, Head Chief of the Iowas, 1844-45, oil on canvas, 71 x 58 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D. C. Source

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Ball-play of the Choctaw—ball up, 1846-50, oil on canvas, 65.4 x 81.4 cm, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington D. C. Source

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Beautiful Prairie Bluffs above the Poncas, 1050 Miles above St. Louis, 1832, oil on canvas, 28.5 x 36.6 cm, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington D. C. Source

George Catlin (1796-1872) was an American artist best known for his portraits of Native Americans and landscapes of the western American frontier along the Mississippi, Arkansas and Red Rivers. Catlin was fascinated by the lives, stories and cultures of the Great Plains indigenous tribes. From 1830 to 1838, he travelled up and down the country, amassing a huge collection of artefacts and executing hundreds of paintings. Upon his return to Pennsylvania, he set up a gallery of these works, though he eventually had to sell the entire collection due to personal debt.

Personal Pinterest updated!

I’ve been pretty slack with it during the past few months, but I’ve finally got round to updating my personal Pinterest page. It is basically a home for the art I post on ArtMastered - and a few cheeky extras! - but the works are categorised by style, geographic location and time period, depending on the simplicity of their classification. So if you like your art neat, organised and easy to navigate around, then you should definitely take a look!

Wyndham Lewis, Composition, 1913, ink, watercolour and graphite on paper, 34.3 x 26.7 cm, Tate Collection. Source
Wyndham Lewis, Composition, 1913, ink, watercolour and graphite on paper, 34.3 x 26.7 cm, Tate Collection. Source
Giuseppe De Nittis, The National Gallery, London, 1877, oil on canvas, 70 x 105 cm, Petit Palais Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris. Source
It’s wonderful to see such a familiar building surrounded by horses, carriages, and figures dressed in top hats and fancy frocks.

Giuseppe De Nittis, The National Gallery, London, 1877, oil on canvas, 70 x 105 cm, Petit Palais Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris. Source

It’s wonderful to see such a familiar building surrounded by horses, carriages, and figures dressed in top hats and fancy frocks.

Francis Bacon, Figure in a Landscape, 1945, oil on canvas, 144.8 x 128.3 cm, Tate Collection. Source
It is believed, according to the Tate, that this painting was actually based on a photograph of Eric Hall, Bacon’s lover, taking a nap on a bench in Hyde Park. And yet the artist has turned what was probably quite an unremarkable scene into a distorted composition rife with pain, emotion and darkness. Typical Bacon.

Francis Bacon, Figure in a Landscape, 1945, oil on canvas, 144.8 x 128.3 cm, Tate Collection. Source

It is believed, according to the Tate, that this painting was actually based on a photograph of Eric Hall, Bacon’s lover, taking a nap on a bench in Hyde Park. And yet the artist has turned what was probably quite an unremarkable scene into a distorted composition rife with pain, emotion and darkness. Typical Bacon.