Ansel Adams, Morning Glories, Massachusetts, 1958, black and white instant print, 8.9 x 11.4 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

Ansel Adams, Morning Glories, Massachusetts, 1958, black and white instant print, 8.9 x 11.4 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

Elizabeth Siddal, Sir Patrick Spens, 1856, watercolour on paper, 24.1 x 22.9 cm, Tate Collection. Source
Siddal depicts a heartbreaking moment in her piece Sir Patrick Spens, which is based on a Scottish poem of the same name. The story goes that the sailor Patrick Spens was asked by the King of Scotland to ship him up to Norway so that he could collect his daughter and bring her back home. In a tragic turn of events, the ship was destroyed in a storm on the return journey, killing all who’d been on board. Siddal’s painting shows the women and children of Scotland realising that their husbands and fathers were lost to the sea.

Elizabeth Siddal, Sir Patrick Spens, 1856, watercolour on paper, 24.1 x 22.9 cm, Tate Collection. Source

Siddal depicts a heartbreaking moment in her piece Sir Patrick Spens, which is based on a Scottish poem of the same name. The story goes that the sailor Patrick Spens was asked by the King of Scotland to ship him up to Norway so that he could collect his daughter and bring her back home. In a tragic turn of events, the ship was destroyed in a storm on the return journey, killing all who’d been on board. Siddal’s painting shows the women and children of Scotland realising that their husbands and fathers were lost to the sea.

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Raphael and the Fornarina, 1814, oil on canvas, 64.8 x 53.3 cm, Harvard Art Museum, Cambridge, MA. Source
Ingres was a huge fan of Raphael, and he painted the subject of the Renaissance great and the model used for one of his most famous works - La Fornarina, from around 1518 - several times. Raphael’s Fornarina muse is usually identified as Margarita Luti, the artist’s lover, whereas Ingres is believed to have used his wife Madeleine Chapelle as the model for his Fornarina.

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Raphael and the Fornarina, 1814, oil on canvas, 64.8 x 53.3 cm, Harvard Art Museum, Cambridge, MA. Source

Ingres was a huge fan of Raphael, and he painted the subject of the Renaissance great and the model used for one of his most famous works - La Fornarina, from around 1518 - several times. Raphael’s Fornarina muse is usually identified as Margarita Luti, the artist’s lover, whereas Ingres is believed to have used his wife Madeleine Chapelle as the model for his Fornarina.

Max Dupain, Sunbaker, 1937, gelatin silver photograph, 37.9 x 42.8 cm,  Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Source
In an iconic image of Australian photography, Dupain’s Sunbaker epitomises that wonderful feeling of a post-swim collapse on the sand.

Max Dupain, Sunbaker, 1937, gelatin silver photograph, 37.9 x 42.8 cm,  Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Source

In an iconic image of Australian photography, Dupain’s Sunbaker epitomises that wonderful feeling of a post-swim collapse on the sand.

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Smyrne, Bournabat, 1873, oil on canvas, 81.3 x 109.9 cm, Private Collection. Source
This is Corot’s imagined impression of Bornova in Turkey, then known as Bournabat. It was painted for the Turkish collector Eram Bey, but he eventually refused to purchase the piece.

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Smyrne, Bournabat, 1873, oil on canvas, 81.3 x 109.9 cm, Private Collection. Source

This is Corot’s imagined impression of Bornova in Turkey, then known as Bournabat. It was painted for the Turkish collector Eram Bey, but he eventually refused to purchase the piece.

Roy Lichtenstein, Look Mickey, 1961, oil on canvas, 121.9 x 175.3 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. Source
Look Mickey is recognised as being the first of Lichtenstein’s paintings to feature a comic-strip style of imagery using Ben-Day dots. He based the composition on a Donald Duck cartoon, but modified the colours and viewpoint to suit his purpose.

Roy Lichtenstein, Look Mickey, 1961, oil on canvas, 121.9 x 175.3 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. Source

Look Mickey is recognised as being the first of Lichtenstein’s paintings to feature a comic-strip style of imagery using Ben-Day dots. He based the composition on a Donald Duck cartoon, but modified the colours and viewpoint to suit his purpose.

The past couple of weeks have been manic, to say the least! I’ve gone from being an unemployed MA student, to having an amazing job that I truly love, whilst volunteering and learning to drive on the side. My degree results are due in October, but I’m so chuffed with the direction everything is going in, that I’m not remotely worried about it. But I’ll keep y’all updated, just the same!

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Katsushika Hokusai, The Jewel River in Musashi Province, 1830-31, ink and colour on paper, 25.5 x 37.5 cm, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Source

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Katsushika Hokusai, Mountains in Clear Weather (Red Fuji), 1831, ink and colour on paper, [no dimensions], Private Collection. Source

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Katsushika Hokusai, Fuji Seen From Kanaya on the Tokaido, c.1830-32, ink and colour on paper, 25.4 x 36.8 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

Here are some beautiful views of Japanese mountains printed by Katsushika Hokusai of Great Wave fame. The bottom two compositions feature Mount Fuji, the tallest mountain in Japan, but I’m unsure of the identity of the mountain in the first view. Fuji or not, it’s a magnificent piece, I think you’ll agree!

Giovanni Bellini, Portrait of Doge Leonardo Loredan, 1501, oil on panel, 62 x 45 cm, The National Gallery, London. Source
Leonardo Loredan became the doge of Venice the same year that this portrait was painted, and he maintained the position until his death in 1521. Bellini’s portrait of Loredan is unusual because of it’s front-on position; these kinds of figures were usually painted in profile.

Giovanni Bellini, Portrait of Doge Leonardo Loredan, 1501, oil on panel, 62 x 45 cm, The National Gallery, London. Source

Leonardo Loredan became the doge of Venice the same year that this portrait was painted, and he maintained the position until his death in 1521. Bellini’s portrait of Loredan is unusual because of it’s front-on position; these kinds of figures were usually painted in profile.

Balthus, Palette series, 1985, painting palettes, [dimensions variable], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source
In this series, Balthus transforms the humble palette into its own canvas by experimenting with the colours and textures of freshly applied paint.
Zoom Info
Balthus, Palette series, 1985, painting palettes, [dimensions variable], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source
In this series, Balthus transforms the humble palette into its own canvas by experimenting with the colours and textures of freshly applied paint.
Zoom Info
Balthus, Palette series, 1985, painting palettes, [dimensions variable], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source
In this series, Balthus transforms the humble palette into its own canvas by experimenting with the colours and textures of freshly applied paint.
Zoom Info
Balthus, Palette series, 1985, painting palettes, [dimensions variable], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source
In this series, Balthus transforms the humble palette into its own canvas by experimenting with the colours and textures of freshly applied paint.
Zoom Info

Balthus, Palette series, 1985, painting palettes, [dimensions variable], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

In this series, Balthus transforms the humble palette into its own canvas by experimenting with the colours and textures of freshly applied paint.

Mary Potter, Golden Kipper, 1939, oil on canvas, 50.8 x 40.6 cm, Tate Collection. Source
According to the Tate, Golden Kipper reveals Potter’s interests in Oriental compositions and the abstract paintings of Paul Klee. The Gallery also addresses the wartime dating of the piece by noting how kippers were seen as ‘precious commodities’ during the tough economic conditions of the Second World War.

Mary Potter, Golden Kipper, 1939, oil on canvas, 50.8 x 40.6 cm, Tate Collection. Source

According to the Tate, Golden Kipper reveals Potter’s interests in Oriental compositions and the abstract paintings of Paul Klee. The Gallery also addresses the wartime dating of the piece by noting how kippers were seen as ‘precious commodities’ during the tough economic conditions of the Second World War.

Joseph Vernet, Summer Evening, Landscape in Italy, 1773, oil on canvas, 89 x 133 cm, The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo. Source
The broken tree on the left seems quite out of place in Vernet’s stunning, almost mythical, landscape. Summer Evening, Landscape in Italy is one of the artist’s later works.

Joseph Vernet, Summer Evening, Landscape in Italy, 1773, oil on canvas, 89 x 133 cm, The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo. Source

The broken tree on the left seems quite out of place in Vernet’s stunning, almost mythical, landscape. Summer Evening, Landscape in Italy is one of the artist’s later works.