A blog dedicated to the study of art history, covering all periods, styles and movements. With regular commentary, exhibition reviews and educational information.

Food Photographer of the Year 2014

Photographic slideshow, featuring the soothing voice of the lovely Jay Rayner. Warning: do not watch 1:09 to 1:33 if you’re hungry. 

Posted on 24 April, 2014

Roy Lichtenstein, Atom Burst, 1965, acrylic on board, 61 x 61 cm, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas

Roy Lichtenstein, Atom Burst, 1965, acrylic on board, 61 x 61 cm, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas

Posted on 24 April, 2014

Jean Dubuffet, Nimble Free Hand to the Rescue, 1964, acrylic on canvas, 149.9 x 200.7 cm, Tate Collection 

Jean Dubuffet, Site Inhabited by Objects, 1965, acrylic on canvas, 130.2 x 162.2 cm, Tate Collection

Posted on 24 April, 2014

Lucian Freud, Girl with Roses, 1948, oil on canvas, 106 x 75 cm, British Council Collection, London

Lucian Freud, Girl with Roses, 1948, oil on canvas, 106 x 75 cm, British Council Collection, London

Posted on 23 April, 2014

Jennifer Durrant, Sweet Pea Painting, 1978-79, acrylic on canvas, 261.6 x 307.3 cm, Tate Collection

Jennifer Durrant, Sweet Pea Painting, 1978-79, acrylic on canvas, 261.6 x 307.3 cm, Tate Collection

Posted on 23 April, 2014

London’s South Bank is easily one of my favourite parts of the entire city. Yesterday, I joined my two friends, Jenny and Charlotte - the birthday girl! - on a day out to see Martin Creed at the Hayward Gallery and the Matisse cut-outs at Tate Modern (reviews of both shows to follow shortly!) The three of us are all currently in the middle of stressful university times; a day-off from writing, which also included lunchtime dim sum and cocktails, was just what we needed.

Posted on 23 April, 2014

Gustave Moreau, Prometheus, 1868, oil on canvas, 51.5 x 87 cm, Musée Gustave-Moreau, Paris

Gustave Moreau, Prometheus, 1868, oil on canvas, 51.5 x 87 cm, Musée Gustave-Moreau, Paris

Posted on 22 April, 2014

Jeff Wall, After ‘Invisible Man’ by Ralph Ellison, the Preface, 1999-2001, 174 x 250.8 cm, MoMA, New York:

After a brief but eventful career that embodies the hopes and humiliations of African Americans at mid-twentieth century, the hero of Ralph Ellison’s celebrated 1952 novel Invisible Man retreats to a secret basement room on the edge of Harlem. There he patiently composes and reflects upon the story we are about to read. “I am invisible,” he explains, “simply because people refuse to see me.”
Making pictures out of stores was once the main business of the visual arts. The rising modernist tradition consigned the practice to the margins of advanced art; for most of the past century, “illustration” has been a term of contempt. In this large, richly detailed and thoroughly absorbing photograph, Wall has all but single-handedly reinvented the challenge.

The novel’s eloquent prologue is short on specifics, except one: the 1,369 lightbulbs that cover the ceiling of the underground lair. Starting with this fantastic detail, Wall scrupulously imagined in his Vancouver studio the concrete form of Ellison’s metaphorical space. Ambitiously reviving a forgotten art, he made visible the Invisible Man.

Jeff Wall, After ‘Invisible Man’ by Ralph Ellison, the Preface, 1999-2001, 174 x 250.8 cm, MoMA, New York:

After a brief but eventful career that embodies the hopes and humiliations of African Americans at mid-twentieth century, the hero of Ralph Ellison’s celebrated 1952 novel Invisible Man retreats to a secret basement room on the edge of Harlem. There he patiently composes and reflects upon the story we are about to read. “I am invisible,” he explains, “simply because people refuse to see me.”

Making pictures out of stores was once the main business of the visual arts. The rising modernist tradition consigned the practice to the margins of advanced art; for most of the past century, “illustration” has been a term of contempt. In this large, richly detailed and thoroughly absorbing photograph, Wall has all but single-handedly reinvented the challenge.

The novel’s eloquent prologue is short on specifics, except one: the 1,369 lightbulbs that cover the ceiling of the underground lair. Starting with this fantastic detail, Wall scrupulously imagined in his Vancouver studio the concrete form of Ellison’s metaphorical space. Ambitiously reviving a forgotten art, he made visible the Invisible Man.

Posted on 22 April, 2014

Vlaho Bukovac, Queen Natalija Obrenović, 1882, oil on canvas, National Museum of Serbia, Belgrade
Natalija Obrenović was the wife of King Milan I of Serbia. This portrait was completed just after Natalia became Milan’s queen.

Vlaho Bukovac, Queen Natalija Obrenović, 1882, oil on canvas, National Museum of Serbia, Belgrade

Natalija Obrenović was the wife of King Milan I of Serbia. This portrait was completed just after Natalia became Milan’s queen.

Posted on 21 April, 2014

Willem van Aelst, Fruit Still Life, 1677, oil on canvas, 58 x 47 cm, Private Collection

Willem van Aelst, Fruit Still Life, 1677, oil on canvas, 58 x 47 cm, Private Collection

Posted on 21 April, 2014

I am considering the benefits of an ArtMastered Youtube channel …

This is absolutely not a set-in-stone idea, but I am thinking that it could be quite an effective way of answering your questions, both general and specific. Anonymous blogs are alway less interesting, after all! And it could be easier for broad discussions that involve a number of artworks, artists etc.

What do you all think? Would this actually interest people?

Posted on 20 April, 2014

Robert Rauschenberg

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Robert Rauschenberg, Bed, 1955, oil and pencil on pillow, quilt, and sheet on wood supports, 191.1 x 80 x 20.3 cm, MoMA, New York

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Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959, mixed media, 207.6 x 177.8 x 61 cm, MoMA, New York

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Robert Rauschenberg, Street Sounds, 1992, screenprint on paper, 116.8 x 139.8 cm, Tate Collection

Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008) was an American artist who worked in various media, though he is particularly famed for his ‘combines’ - flat surfaces built up with objects, textiles and paint - and white/black/red paintings. According to the Tate, Rauschenberg’s work falls somewhere between abstract expressionism and pop art.

Posted on 20 April, 2014

Clare Atwood, John Gielgud’s Room, 1933, oil on canvas, 62.9 x 76.2 cm, Tate Collection
John Gielgud was an English actor and theatre director. When Clare Atwood painted Gielgud’s flat on St. Martin’s Lane in London, the actor was playing Richard II in Gordon Daviot’s Richard of Bordeaux at the New Theatre near King’s College.

Clare Atwood, John Gielgud’s Room, 1933, oil on canvas, 62.9 x 76.2 cm, Tate Collection

John Gielgud was an English actor and theatre director. When Clare Atwood painted Gielgud’s flat on St. Martin’s Lane in London, the actor was playing Richard II in Gordon Daviot’s Richard of Bordeaux at the New Theatre near King’s College.

Posted on 20 April, 2014

William Morris, wallpaper design, c.1872, print on paper, 84.7 x 66.7 cm V&A Museum, London

William Morris, wallpaper design, c.1872, print on paper, 84.7 x 66.7 cm V&A Museum, London

Posted on 20 April, 2014

Marc Da Cunha Lopes, Primary Bug series, 2010

Posted on 19 April, 2014



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