A blog dedicated to the study of art history, covering all periods, styles and movements. With regular commentary, exhibition reviews and educational information.

Rome: Ruins of the Forum, Looking Towards the Capitol by Canaletto, 1742. Rome is a fascinating place to study in terms of its changing appearance and how it has needed to work around the display and layout of the ancient ruins found across the city, (I have just completed a university module on this exact topic!) I believe the foreground structure is what is left of the Temple of Castor and Pollux, with the colonnade in the middle ground belonging to the Temple of Saturn. At the very end of the picture plane, creating the majority of the skyline shape, is the Palazzo Senatori. This building borders the south end of the Piazza del Campidoglio located at the summit of the Capitoline Hill, (the current appearance of the square is the design of Michelangelo). It is fair to say that some of the figures in this piece could be identified as tourists in the way they seem to admire the ruins as though they have never seen them before. This could therefore indicate that they may be part of the Grand Tour, which was a European excursion for the wealthiest men in Britain and Europe that involved a substantial amount of time studying the art and classical architecture of the city of Rome.

Rome: Ruins of the Forum, Looking Towards the Capitol by Canaletto, 1742. Rome is a fascinating place to study in terms of its changing appearance and how it has needed to work around the display and layout of the ancient ruins found across the city, (I have just completed a university module on this exact topic!) I believe the foreground structure is what is left of the Temple of Castor and Pollux, with the colonnade in the middle ground belonging to the Temple of Saturn. At the very end of the picture plane, creating the majority of the skyline shape, is the Palazzo Senatori. This building borders the south end of the Piazza del Campidoglio located at the summit of the Capitoline Hill, (the current appearance of the square is the design of Michelangelo). It is fair to say that some of the figures in this piece could be identified as tourists in the way they seem to admire the ruins as though they have never seen them before. This could therefore indicate that they may be part of the Grand Tour, which was a European excursion for the wealthiest men in Britain and Europe that involved a substantial amount of time studying the art and classical architecture of the city of Rome.

Posted on 1 June, 2012

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